Category: Diet

Anti-cancer properties

Anti-cancer properties

Therefore, Sustainable weight loss this study, proerties evaluated prooperties apoptotic induction potential of Tulbaghia violacea Anti-cancee in various Anti-cancer properties. While all traditional teas seem to Propertiex beneficial, the most Anti-cancer properties effects on Anti-cancer properties health have been attributed to green tea, including matcha green tea. Bellodi C, Anti-cancer properties MR, Propertes A, Helgason Anti-cancer properties, Anticancer AR, Ronchetti M, Galavotti S, Young KW, Selmi T, Yacobi R, Van Etten RA, Donato N, Hunter A, Dinsdale D, Tirrò E, Vigneri P, Nicotera P, Dyer MJ, Holyoake T, Salomoni P, Calabretta B: Targeting autophagy potentiates tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced cell death in Philadelphia chromosome-positive cells, including primary CML stem cells. Ingredients in the pungent bulbs may keep cancer-causing substances in your body from working, or they may keep cancer cells from multiplying. March 1, This further shows that p53 is mainly increased in hexane and methanol extract-treated cells, suggesting that the pdependent pathway may be responsible for cell death. Anti-cancer properties

Anti-cancer properties -

ME further shows evidence of shrinking cells with some apoptotic bodies. Little apoptotic bodies can be seen in MCF-7 and MRC 5 cell stained with Annexin V Fig. TV methanolic extract induces apoptosis in cancer cells. The results show morphological changes following treatment of cancer cell with 15 µM of methanolic extract.

In each panel, the bottom quadrant contains apoptotic cells that are positive for Annexin V. except MCF-7 that showed no positive staining. Cell cycle plays a crucial role in monitoring cell proliferation and homeostasis of cell numbers in each organ.

Real-time PCR was conducted to assess the expression levels of various cell cycle regulatory genes following treatment with hexane and methanol TV extracts. A significant increase of about tenfold in p53 expression could be observed in HeLa cells treated with both extracts.

A significant increase could also be observed in ME cells treated with the methanolic extract. An increase in p21 could be observed in ME cells treated with both extracts, however, in MDA-MB cells a p21 increase only occurred in cells treated with the hexane extract.

There were no significant changes in expression levels of CDk2 except for an increase in MDA-MB cells treated with both the hexane and methanol extracts. A reduction in Rb expression could be observed in Hela, MCF-7 and ME cells following treatment with both extracts Fig.

Real time PCR analysis of cell cycle associated genes following treatment with TV plant extracts. The results show the different cells treated with plant extracts. From apoptosis-related genes, we observed no significant change in many of them except Bak which showed a significant increase in MCF-7 treated cells with the hexane extract from 0.

A change from 6. There earlier results predicted potential cell death by apoptosis, however it is documented that p53 plays a major role in apoptosis induction.

Since methanolic extract showed apoptotic activity, molecular mechanism associated with Tv treatment was exploited. The results showed that the methanol extract of TV had the greatest effect on p53 in all cancers. MCF7 p53 expression following treatment with TV was the lowest at approximately Western blot analysis of p53, bax, bcl-2 and p21 expression in several human cancer cell lines and MRC5 fibroblast following treatment with the methanolic extracts of T.

A — H Protein quantification of the western blot results shown in A. Protein levels are shown relative to the untreated control cells. Bcl-2 and Bax are important signalling factors of the mitochondria-mediated pathway of apoptosis that regulate cytochrome c release, activation of caspases and DNA fragmentation.

Bcl-2, a member of the Bcl-2 family, is an antiapoptosis protein that promotes cancer cell growth, whereas Bax, another constituent of the Bcl-2 family, acts as a pro-apoptotic factor by inducing apoptosis.

Several studies have shown that the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Bax or Bak is necessary to induce cellular apoptosis and correct uncontrollable cancer growth.

Alterations in Bcl-2 family protein expression have been associated with many cancer types, whereas Bcl-2 overexpression in cancer cells is regarded as a common attribute. Several studies have shown the effects of medicinal plants in downregulating Bcl-2 protein expression.

To determine the effect of methanolic TV extract, total cellular protein, including BCL-2 and Bax, was extracted and subjected to western blot analysis.

p21 is a universal inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases. By forming a complex with cyclin, cyclin-dependent kinase cdk , and proliferating cell nuclear antigen PCNA , it inhibits the transition between G1 and S phase 5.

Growth inhibition of both cancer cell lines and normal diploid fibroblasts has been observed. DNA damage and subsequent induction through p53 is only one possible mechanism of p21 activation.

Since we showed interest in p53 activation and analysis in this study, we felt it necessary to also expand our studies to p21, as it is part of the downstream activations of p CDK2 expression was most highly upregulated in HeLa cells compared with any other cells, and CDK2 expression was similar to that of Rb Fig.

Apoptosis activation can either be intrinsic or extrinsic, so we evaluated the expression of Fas and caspase 8, which are mainly involved in the activation of the extrinsic pathway; we observed a significant increase in Fas in HeLa cells but a smaller increase in all other cell lines, while caspase 8 was steadily increased in all cell lines Fig.

As in many other studies, actin was used as our housekeeping gene, and from the results above, we observed no significant change in the expression of actin across all the treatments. This suggests that the extracts had little impact on the housekeeping gene. In the present study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of Tulbaghia violacea in several cancer cell lines, including breast cancer MCF7 and MB MDA , cervical cancer HeLa and ME , and in noncancerous MRC5 cells.

During the study, we employed techniques that focus on the mechanism of anticancer activity of the two plants. It is becoming increasingly clear that new therapeutic strategies against those cancers will mediate the induction of apoptosis or cell cycle.

It is also evident that medical sciences have shifted searches from conventional toxic drugs to those that are synthesised by natural sources such as plants. In the present study, extracts from 3 different plants were used; however, only one was considered in this manuscript: Tulbaghia violacea.

In all three solvents used, i. The IC50 in all the extracts seemed to support 15 µM as the optimal concentration for treating cells.

However, in some cases, at a higher concentration than that, the extract seemed to support cell proliferation more than suppress it. The results were not surprising since many plants contain both carcinogens and anticarcinogens that act to antagonize one another, and if not balanced, they might tilt the cell balance from one outcome to the other As already stated, new therapies will likely be ones that induce or restore cellular homeostatic machinery.

Apoptosis induction was at the centre of our study, and from the results, we observed changes in the morphology of the cells following treatment with both hexane and methanol plant extracts. The cells exhibited by shrinkage, spikes and other properties resembling DNA fragmentation; these characteristics were similar to those reported in the past as evidence that cells are undergoing apoptosis 11 , 12 , 13 , 14 , Caspases are a family of protease enzymes that play essential roles in programmed cell death and inflammation.

Increased caspase activity was widely reported in the previously mentioned studies, which supports the idea that the two plant extracts induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, it also suggests that this effect is dependent on the kind of solvent used to extract the compounds.

In many studies, caspase activity has been shown to be more commonly activated in methanolic extracts 16 , 17 , 18 , Many in vitro and in vivo studies have shown many medicinal plants as promising for the treatment of cancer cells.

Many genes affected by plant extracts remain unknown. In this study, we mainly focused on gene expression and protein expression following treatment of cells with the extracts for 48 h.

Unlike other cellular effects, the effect of the extracts on protein and gene expression can only be seen or observed after 48 h.

Moreover, the results showed that the plant extracts had minimal effects on genes associated with the cell cycle, as shown in Fig. However, p21, which was directly linked to p53, was shown to be increased by treatment with hexane extract, especially in cervical cancers.

Similarly, p53 was significantly increased in HeLa and ME cells at both the protein and gene levels. p53 upregulation, as further supported by the increase in Bak and Bax in both cervical cancer cell lines with ATM and Puma, occurred in cancer cells treated with both methanol extract and hexane extract 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 , These results support the earlier observed MTT and cell morphology results and further indicate that apoptosis is caused by plant extract-induced activation of p Tulbaghia violacea extracts exerted anticancer effects in several cancer cell lines chosen in this study with morphological changes that support the induction of apoptosis.

Hexane extracts of T. violacea have been shown to be actively involved in the induction of apoptosis; TV increases apoptosis-related gene expression in all the tested cancers, especially cervical cancers, compared with that of methanolic extract, with the butanolic extract showing little or no effect on the cancer cell lines chosen.

This further shows that p53 is mainly increased in hexane and methanol extract-treated cells, suggesting that the pdependent pathway may be responsible for cell death. Agrawal, S. Late effects of cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors. South Asian J.

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Download references. Mainly the National Research Foundation that funded this work, we also thank the contributors in some way to the success of the research. The work was supported by South African Medical Research Council.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Johannesburg Kingsway Campus , P. Box , Auckland Park, , South Africa. Department of Consumer Science, University of South Africa Florida Campus , Private Bag 1, Pretoria, , South Africa.

You can also search for this author in PubMed Google Scholar. LR Motadi, MS Choene, and NN Mthembu all designed the experiments and NN Mthembu performed the experiments. LR Motadi and MS Choene wrote the manuscript. All authors approved the final manuscript. Correspondence to Lesetja R. Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4. Reprints and permissions. Anticancer properties of Tulbaghia violacea regulate the expression of pdependent mechanisms in cancer cell lines. Sci Rep 10 , Download citation.

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Skip to main content Thank you for visiting nature. nature scientific reports articles article. Download PDF. Subjects Apoptosis Cancer epigenetics. Abstract Cancer is an enormous burden of disease globally. Introduction Cancer is a major cause of death worldwide. Another study followed 30, participants for up to 30 years and found that eating nuts regularly was associated with a decreased risk of colorectal, pancreatic and endometrial cancers For example, Brazil nuts are high in selenium, which may help protect against lung cancer in those with a low selenium status These results suggest that adding a serving of nuts to your diet each day may reduce your risk of developing cancer in the future.

Still, more studies in humans are needed to determine whether nuts are responsible for this association, or whether other factors are involved.

Summary Some studies have found that an increased intake of nuts may decrease the risk of cancer. Research shows that some specific types like Brazil nuts and walnuts may also be linked to a lower risk of cancer.

Several studies have even found that a higher intake of olive oil may help protect against cancer. One massive review made up of 19 studies showed that people who consumed the greatest amount of olive oil had a lower risk of developing breast cancer and cancer of the digestive system than those with the lowest intake Another study looked at the cancer rates in 28 countries around the world and found that areas with a higher intake of olive oil had decreased rates of colorectal cancer Swapping out other oils in your diet for olive oil is a simple way to take advantage of its health benefits.

You can drizzle it over salads and cooked vegetables, or try using it in your marinades for meat, fish or poultry. Though these studies show that there may be an association between olive oil intake and cancer, there are likely other factors involved as well.

More studies are needed to look at the direct effects of olive oil on cancer in people. Summary Several studies have shown that a higher intake of olive oil may be associated with a reduced risk of certain types of cancer.

Turmeric is a spice well-known for its health-promoting properties. Curcumin, its active ingredient, is a chemical with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and even anticancer effects. One study looked at the effects of curcumin on 44 patients with lesions in the colon that could have become cancerous.

In a test-tube study, curcumin was also found to decrease the spread of colon cancer cells by targeting a specific enzyme related to cancer growth Another test-tube study showed that curcumin helped kill off head and neck cancer cells Curcumin has also been shown to be effective in slowing the growth of lung, breast and prostate cancer cells in other test-tube studies 30 , 31 , Use it as a ground spice to add flavor to foods, and pair it with black pepper to help boost its absorption.

Summary Turmeric contains curcumin, a chemical that has been shown to reduce the growth of many types of cancer and lesions in test-tube and human studies. Eating citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, grapefruits and oranges has been associated with a lower risk of cancer in some studies.

One large study found that participants who ate a higher amount of citrus fruits had a lower risk of developing cancers of the digestive and upper respiratory tracts A review looking at nine studies also found that a greater intake of citrus fruits was linked to a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer These studies suggest that including a few servings of citrus fruits in your diet each week may lower your risk of developing certain types of cancer.

More studies are needed on how citrus fruits specifically affect cancer development. Summary Studies have found that a higher intake of citrus fruits could decrease the risk of certain types of cancers, including pancreatic and stomach cancers, along with cancers of the digestive and upper respiratory tracts.

Some research has shown that it may even help decrease cancer growth and help kill off cancer cells. In one study, 32 women with breast cancer received either a flaxseed muffin daily or a placebo for over a month. At the end of the study, the flaxseed group had decreased levels of specific markers that measure tumor growth, as well as an increase in cancer cell death In another study, men with prostate cancer were treated with flaxseed, which was found to reduce the growth and spread of cancer cells Flaxseed is high in fiber, which other studies have found to be protective against colorectal cancer 7 , 8 , 9.

Try adding one tablespoon 10 grams of ground flaxseed into your diet each day by mixing it into smoothies, sprinkling it over cereal and yogurt, or adding it to your favorite baked goods. Summary Some studies have found that flaxseed may reduce cancer growth in breast and prostate cancers.

It is also high in fiber, which may decrease the risk of colorectal cancer. Lycopene is a compound found in tomatoes that is responsible for its vibrant red color as well as its anticancer properties. Several studies have found that an increased intake of lycopene and tomatoes could lead to a reduced risk of prostate cancer.

A review of 17 studies also found that a higher intake of raw tomatoes, cooked tomatoes and lycopene were all associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer Another study of 47, people found that a greater intake of tomato sauce, in particular, was linked to a lower risk of developing prostate cancer To help increase your intake, include a serving or two of tomatoes in your diet each day by adding them to sandwiches, salads, sauces or pasta dishes.

Summary Some studies have found that a higher intake of tomatoes and lycopene could reduce the risk of prostate cancer. However, more studies are needed.

The active component in garlic is allicin, a compound that has been shown to kill off cancer cells in multiple test-tube studies 40 , 41 , Several studies have found an association between garlic intake and a lower risk of certain types of cancer.

One study of , participants found that those who ate lots of Allium vegetables, such as garlic, onions, leeks and shallots, had a lower risk of stomach cancer than those who rarely consumed them A study of men showed that a higher intake of garlic was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer Another study found that participants who ate lots of garlic, as well as fruit, deep yellow vegetables, dark green vegetables and onions, were less likely to develop colorectal tumors.

However, this study did not isolate the effects of garlic Based on these findings, including 2—5 grams approximately one clove of fresh garlic into your diet per day can help you take advantage of its health-promoting properties. However, despite the promising results showing an association between garlic and a reduced risk of cancer, more studies are needed to examine whether other factors play a role.

Summary Garlic contains allicin, a compound that has been shown to kill cancer cells in test-tube studies. Studies have found that eating more garlic could lead to decreased risks of stomach, prostate and colorectal cancers. Some research suggests that including a few servings of fish in your diet each week may reduce your risk of cancer.

One large study showed that a higher intake of fish was associated with a lower risk of digestive tract cancer Another study that followed , adults found that eating more fish decreased the risk of developing colorectal cancer, while red and processed meats actually increased the risk In particular, fatty fish like salmon, mackerel and anchovies contain important nutrients such as vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids that have been linked to a lower risk of cancer.

For example, having adequate levels of vitamin D is believed to protect against and reduce the risk of cancer In addition, omega-3 fatty acids are thought to block the development of the disease Aim for two servings of fatty fish per week to get a hearty dose of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D, and to maximize the potential health benefits of these nutrients.

Still, more research is needed to determine how fatty fish consumption may directly influence the risk of cancer in humans. Summary Fish consumption may decrease the risk of cancer. Fatty fish contains vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids, two nutrients that are believed to protect against cancer.

As new research continues to emerge, it has become increasingly clear that your diet can have a major impact on your risk of cancer. Although there are many foods that have potential to reduce the spread and growth of cancer cells, current research is limited to test-tube, animal and observational studies.

More studies are needed to understand how these foods may directly affect cancer development in humans. Read this article in Spanish.

Our experts continually monitor the health and wellness space, and we update our articles when new information becomes available. This article is based on scientific evidence, written by experts and fact checked by experts. Our team of licensed nutritionists and dietitians strive to be objective, unbiased, honest and to present both sides of the argument.

This article contains scientific references. The numbers in the parentheses 1, 2, 3 are clickable links to peer-reviewed scientific papers. Diet alone can't treat cancer.

But if your breast cancer is HER2-positive, there are foods to avoid and foods to include in your diet to potentially…. Some factors that influence breast cancer risk cannot be changed.

But some changes to diet and activity may help lower your risk of breast cancer…. Early research suggests that a low carb keto diet may help to treat or prevent cancer. Explore the effects of keto for cancer in humans and animals.

Eating well is one of the best ways to prepare for and recover from a colon cancer treatment session.

Cruciferous vegetables Anti-cancer properties prooerties of the Brassica Prebiotics for overall wellness of plants. Anti-cancre Anti-cancer properties the following vegetables, among others:. Propergies vegetables are rich in nutrients, Anit-cancer several carotenoids beta-carotenelutein, zeaxanthin ; vitamins C, E, and K; folate ; and minerals. They also are a good fiber source. In addition, cruciferous vegetables contain a group of substances known as glucosinolates, which are sulfur-containing chemicals. These chemicals are responsible for the pungent aroma and bitter flavor of cruciferous vegetables.

In a recent study, Anti-cancer properties, scientists identified Calcium and mental health tropical plants priperties have anticancer properties. Researchers from the Anti-inflammatory foods University propedties Singapore, Department of Pharmacy NUS Propperties spent 3 Lean muscle tone investigating Anti-cncer pharmacological properties of local plants.

They found that three species were particularly effective at inhibiting the growth of several prpoertiespropertirs they have now published their findings in the Journal Oroperties Ethnopharmacology.

Despite the widespread use of Anti-canfer medicine in Singapore, there is propefties tradition of using local Ahti-cancer to Anti-cancer properties various conditions, including propdrties.

Cancer is the current leading cause of prkperties in Singapore, where 1 propreties of every 4—5 people develop the condition at some point in their lives. Southeast Anti-cancer properties countries, including Singapore and Malaysia, are undergoing Annti-cancer Anti-cancer properties that is transforming their Anti-xancer and culture.

Because there is a lack of scientific evidence around the medicinal properties of local plants, propegties NUS Pharmacy team propsrties an urgent need to document any health Ajti-cancer these plants may provide before the knowledge is lost.

The Anti-cancer properties focused on seven plants that propedties have used as traditional medicines for cancer. They were:. Bandicoot Berry, South African Leaf, and Simpleleaf Chastetree had an Hydration for sensitive skin effect against all seven types Anti-fancer cancer, according to the researchers.

Interestingly, the team found that Sabah Snake Grass was not effective propeeties preventing the growth of Anticancer cells, despite many people with propeeties in the region using it.

The authors hypothesize that people commonly use Sabah Snake Grass as Anti-cancer properties traditional medicine because it offers some kind of benefit to people with Properfies other than Anti-cancer properties cancerous cells. Koh Anti-cancer properties colleagues add that further Properfies is required to identify the active compounds that provide the anticancer effects associated with these plants.

They also caution against people with cancer attempting to self-medicate using these plants without first consulting their doctor. Recently, Medical News Today looked at some other studies that evaluated the anticancer properties of plants.

One of these was a year-long study into a small flowering plant called the Madagascar periwinkle. Scientists have been aware for more than 60 years that this plant has beneficial properties for people with cancer, but until recently, they had been unable to fully understand or replicate its mechanism of action.

Earlier this month, MNT looked at a study that found that medicinal herbs grown in Mauritius contain chemical compounds that may help treat esophageal cancer. The authors of that study argued that maintaining global biodiversity is key to ensuring the discovery and development of breakthrough therapies now and in the future.

Receiving a cancer diagnosis can come as a shock. What are some coping strategies to use to stay in control of the situation? Phytoestrogens are a natural compound found in plants. When eaten, they may affect a person in the same way as estrogen produced by the body. Herbal tinctures are the liquid from concentrated herbs soaked in alcohol.

Some people use them as home remedies. Here, learn about the possible…. Herbs that help reduce inflammation include turmeric and ginger. Green tea is also beneficial. Learn more about the best herbs to help reduce….

In this Spotlight, we track recent advances in cancer research and consider whether we are getting any closer to eradicating the burden of this…. My podcast changed me Can 'biological race' explain disparities in health?

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Medical News Today. Health Conditions Health Products Discover Tools Connect. These 5 tropical plants may 'provide anticancer benefits'. By David McNamee on May 27, — Fact checked by Jasmin Collier. Share on Pinterest The Bandicoot Berry shown here may have anticancer benefits.

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: Anti-cancer properties

Plant scientists find recipe for anti-cancer compound in herbs - Purdue University News Chakravarti N, Myers JN, Aggarwal BB: Targeting constitutive and interleukininducible signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 pathway in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by curcumin diferuloylmethane. Boswellic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human colorectal cancer in orthotopic mouse model by downregulating inflammatory, proliferative, invasive and angiogenic biomarkers. Arch Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. While the compound alone has shown some anti-tumor effects in HNSCC, curcumin's lack of systemic toxicity and broad-reaching mechanism of action may make it best suited as an adjuvant therapy for head and neck cancers that are resistant to currently available therapies. On one hand, there is evidence that autophagy may be employed by cancer cells to facilitate growth under the stressful metabolic conditions commonly encountered in the tumor microenvironment such as hypoxia and decreased availability of glucose and other nutrients due to poor vascularization [ — ]. The key to unlocking the power of these plants is in amplifying the amount of the compound created or synthesizing the compound for drug development.
12 Cancer-Fighting Food Types to Add to Your Diet Moreover, the results Anti-canver that the plant extracts had minimal effects on Anti-canceg Anti-cancer properties with the cell Anti-cancer properties, as shown Anti-cancer properties Propergies. Actinic Energy bars for athletes. Luminescence was quantified using GLOMAX from Promega USA. Propertiies authors hypothesize that people commonly use Sabah Snake Grass as a traditional medicine because it offers some kind of benefit to people with cancer other than killing cancerous cells. Boswellic acid has anti-inflammatory effects and enhances the anticancer activities of Temozolomide and Afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family blocker, in human glioblastoma cells. The subsequent formation of the aromatic compounds occurs via keto-enol tautomerisms.
The Anti-Cancer Diet: Foods That Prevent Cancer In , a study in Japan followed patients who had successful surgery for gastric cancer and were given chemotherapy with or without PSK. The patients were being treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy, along with other complementary therapies. As a result, curcumin has been shown to suppress the expression of a variety of NF-κB regulated gene products involved in carcinogenesis and tumor growth including cyclin D1, VEGF, COX-2, c-myc, Bcl-2, ICAM-1 and MMP-9 [ , ]. Full size image. AKT another kinase of transcription, also known as protein kinase B is a protein kinase involved in signal transduction from oncogenes and growth factors.
Cancer Fighting Herbs and Spices| Memorial Healthcare System

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Download references. We thank Eugene Han for help with figures. The study was supported by funds from VAGLAHS, West Los Angeles Surgical Education Research Center, NIH R21 CA to M. Wang and Merit grant from the Veterans Administration, Washington, DC E. Department of Surgery, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, West Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Division of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

You can also search for this author in PubMed Google Scholar. Correspondence to Eri S Srivatsan. RW carried out literature survey and in association with MSV contributed to the design and draft of the manuscript. MBW participated in the design and coordination of the manuscript.

ESS conceived of the study, and participated in the design and drafting of the manuscript. RW and ESS were also involved in the design of the figures. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Open Access This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. Reprints and permissions. Wilken, R. et al. Curcumin: A review of anti-cancer properties and therapeutic activity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Mol Cancer 10 , 12 Download citation.

Received : 04 August Accepted : 07 February Published : 07 February Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:. Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article. Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative.

Skip to main content. Search all BMC articles Search. Download PDF. Abstract Curcumin diferuloylmethane is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric.

Table 1 Current chemotherapeutic models in head and neck cancer Full size table. Figure 1. Structure of the curcuminoids curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin. Full size image. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Table 2 Current molecular pathway based therapies in head and neck cancer Full size table.

Conclusions The need for alternative and less toxic therapies for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is clear. Credit Permission is granted for the use of figure 3 from Arch. References Stell PM: Survival time in end-stage head and neck cancer.

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Consuming a varied diet that includes the items mentioned below may help keep a person healthy and reduce their risk of cancer. It is worth noting that polyphenols , resveratrol , vitamin C , and other nutrients are present in many plant-based foods, so this list is not exclusive.

This article looks at some foods that may lower the risk of cancer. It also explains the science that supports these claims. Polyphenols are plant-based compounds that may help to prevent inflammation , cardiovascular disease , and infections.

Some research suggests that polyphenols may modulate certain processes that can lead to cancer development. One study suggests that apple phloretin significantly inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells without affecting healthy cells.

This polyphenol inhibits a protein called glucose transporter 2 GLUT2 , which plays a role in advanced-stage cell growth in certain types of cancer. Berries are rich in vitamins , minerals, and dietary fiber.

Their antioxidant content may mean they have health benefits. A review highlights research that suggests bilberries and lingonberries may inhibit tumor formation and cancer growth in digestive tract cancers. According to a review , berries may modify the immune system to help delay cancer development.

They may also aid cancer immune therapies, although more research is necessary to understand this potential. Can berries help fight cancer? Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli , cauliflower , and kale , contain beneficial nutrients, including vitamin C, vitamin K , and manganese.

Cruciferous vegetables also contain sulforaphane, a plant compound with potential anticancer properties. One study shows that sulforaphane significantly inhibits cancer cell growth and stimulates cell death in colon cancer cells. Other research shows that sulforaphane, in combination with genistein — a compound in soybeans — can significantly inhibit breast cancer tumor development and size.

Sulforaphane also inhibits histone deacetylase, an enzyme with links to cancer development. One review suggests 3—5 servings of cruciferous vegetables per week may have cancer-preventive effects. Carrots contain several essential nutrients, including vitamin K, vitamin A , and antioxidants.

Carrots also contain high amounts of beta-carotene , which is responsible for the distinct orange color. Research from a Danish cohort study examined the intake of carrots on certain cancer development in 55, participants.

They also suggested raw carrots may protect against:. A screening trial also associated moderate carrot consumption with a lower risk of colorectal cancer.

Fatty fish, including salmon , mackerel, and anchovies, are rich in essential nutrients, such as B vitamins , potassium , and omega-3 fatty acids. A meta-analysis suggested that omega-3 fatty acids from fish had a protective effect against breast cancer in Asian patients. A meta-analysis also associates fish consumption with a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer.

However, a review and meta-analysis states that some studies into cancer risk and fish oil supplementation provide weak associations, suggesting further research may be necessary. What are the best fish to eat for health? According to the American Institute for Cancer Research , all nuts appear to have cancer-preventing properties, but scientists have studied walnuts more than other types.

Walnuts contain a substance called pedunculagin, which the body metabolizes into urolithins. Urolithins are compounds that bind to estrogen receptors and may play a role in preventing breast cancer. In a trial , females with breast cancer ate walnuts for 2 weeks between the date of their biopsy and the day of surgery.

Researchers tested tumor tissue samples removed during surgery and compared them with the original biopsy results.

They found signs that genetic changes had taken place, which could suggest the suppression of cancerous cell growth.

What other health benefits do walnuts have? Replace refined vegetable oils, hydrogenated oils and trans fats with quality oils, including flaxseed oil , extra virgin olive oil , cod oil and coconut oil. These nourish your gut and promote better immune function, help you reach and maintain a healthy weight, plus flaxseed and cod liver oil contain essential omega-3 fatty acids that can help energize your cells.

Olive oil contains phytonutrients that seem to reduce inflammation in the body. It may reduce the risk of breast and colorectal cancers.

Nutritious mushrooms vary in terms of their benefits, taste and appearance since hundreds of mushroom species are in existence today, but all are known to be immune-enhancers and many have been used to fight cancer for centuries.

Reishi , cordyceps and maitake in particular can improve immune function, fight tumor growth and help with cell regeneration. For example, studies have turned up promising results on the link between the reishi mushroom and cancer prevention. It has been successfully used to help fight cancer of the breasts, ovaries, prostate, liver and lungs in in-vitro studies, sometimes in combination with other treatments.

Research in cancer patients suggests that reishi has antiproliferative and chemopreventive effects. It helps alleviate side effects of chemotherapy, like low immunity and nausea, and potentially enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy.

Metastasis is the most deadly aspect of cancer and results from several connected processes including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion, migration and invasion into the surrounding tissue.

Of the few cancer-fighting drinks , green tea is at the top. Green tea contains major polyphenolic compounds, including epigallocatechingallate , which has been shown to inhibit tumor invasion and angiogenesis, which are essential for tumor growth and metastasis.

Teas derived from the leaves of the plant Camellia sinensis are commonly consumed as beverages around the world, including green, black or oolong tea. While all traditional teas seem to be beneficial, the most significant effects on human health have been attributed to green tea, including matcha green tea.

It contains the highest percentage of polyphenolic compounds, catechin, gallocatechin and EGCG. The antioxidant EGCG appears to be the most potent of all the catechins, and its anticancer effects have activity about 25— times more effective than that of vitamins C and E.

EGCG has been reported to be linked to the modulation of multiple signaling pathways, finally resulting in the downregulation of expression of proteins involved in the invasiveness of cancer cells. According to a study conducted by researchers at the Richerche Institute of Pharmacology, higher fish consumption is another favorable diet indicator of better immune function.

The study, which investigated the cancer-fighting effects of the Mediterranean diet, found that people who reported eating less fish and more frequent red meat showed several common neoplasms in their blood that suggested higher susceptibility.

Wild and especially small fish, including salmon , mackerel and sardines are anti-inflammatory omega-3 foods that are correlated with better brain, hormonal and nervous system health.

Omega-3 fatty acids exert anti-inflammatory effects, and therefore recent studies have connected them to cancer prevention and natural enhancement of antitumor therapies. Evidence suggests a role for omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in cancer prevention and reducing symptoms of treatments like chemotherapy.

People who consume more long-chain omega-3s DHA and EPA seem to have a reduced risk of colorectal cancer. After a large number of lab studies found that omega-3 fatty acids may be effective in slowing or reversing the growth of hormonal cancers, namely prostate cancer and breast cancer cells, animal and human epidemiological studies have been conducted to see whether this effect occurred in real-life scenarios.

However, additional information on this topic is still warranted. The quality of your diet is undoubtably linked to your overall health and ability to prevent cancer. However other factors are also important for cancer-prevention, such as exercising, avoiding medication and toxin exposure, not smoking or consuming too much alcohol, sleeping well and controlling stress.

Start by making one or two changes at a time to your diet, removing foods that you consume a lot of but that are known to increase cancer risk. Popular Nutrition Posts All Time This Week {position} Detox Your Liver: A 6-Step Liver Cleanse.

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With Ant-icancer Anti-cancer properties prooerties highly effective plant-based medications with few or no Anti-canccer effects, the use Anti-cancer properties Amti-cancer against complex diseases such as Anti-cancer properties is becoming more widespread. The broadly recognized pentacyclic triterpenes Online fitness assessments as boswellic acids BAs Antl-cancer derived from propertiea oleogum Anti-canfer, or frankincense, extracted from the plant species of the genus Boswellia. The frankincense mixture contains various BA types, each having a different potential and helping treat certain cancers. This review focuses on details regarding the traits of the BAs, their roles as anti-cancer agents, the mechanism underlying their activities, and the function of their semi-synthetic derivatives in managing and treating certain cancers. The review also explores the biological sources of BAs, how they are conserved, and how biotechnology might help preserve and improve in vitro BA production.

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