Category: Diet

Waist circumference and self-image

Waist circumference and self-image

Trends Ideal eating schedule income and wealth inequalities. Diabetes Care 32 xnd, e70 Issue Iron in marine applications. There self-umage evidence that the latter can be deleterious to self-esteem. Yonsei Med J. Thus, for a given waist circumference, a larger BMI might represent a phenotype with elevations in lower body subcutaneous adipose tissue.

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Measuring Waist Circumference

Waist circumference and self-image -

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No funding or honorarium was provided by either the IAS or the ICCR to the members of the writing group for the production of this article. The scientific director of the ICCR J. is funded by a Foundation Grant Funding Reference Number FDN from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Community Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Department of Health Sciences and the EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care IRCCS MultiMedica, Sesto San Giovanni, Italy.

Lipid Clinic Heart Institute InCor , University of São Paulo, Medical School Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil. Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Department of Kinesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.

Department of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Clínica Las Condes, Santiago, Chile. Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard T. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.

Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padua, Padova, Italy. School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, and Division of Cardiology, Anschutz University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka, Japan. Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.

You can also search for this author in PubMed Google Scholar. and J. researched data for the article. made a substantial contribution to discussion of the content.

wrote the article. Correspondence to Robert Ross. reports receiving speaker fees from Metagenics and Standard Process and a research grant from California Walnut Commission. reports receiving consulting and speaker fess from Amgen, Astra Zeneca, Akcea, Biolab, Esperion, Kowa, Merck, MSD, Novo Nordisk, Sanofi Regeneron, Akcea, Kowa and Esperion.

reports grants and personal fees from Kowa Company, Ltd. and Kaken Pharmaceutical Co. also has patents issued with Fujirebio and Kyowa Medex Co. reports his role as a scientific adviser for PROMINENT Kowa Company Ltd. The remaining authors declare no competing interests.

Nature Reviews Endocrinology thanks R. Kelishadi and the other, anonymous, reviewer s for their contribution to the peer review of this work. Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

The ability to correctly predict the proportion of participants in a given group who will experience an event. The probability of a diagnostic test or risk prediction instrument to distinguish between higher and lower risk.

The relative increase in the predicted probabilities for individuals who experience events and the decrease for individuals who do not. The highest value of VO 2 that is, oxygen consumption attained during an incremental or other high-intensity exercise test. Open Access This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.

Reprints and permissions. Waist circumference as a vital sign in clinical practice: a Consensus Statement from the IAS and ICCR Working Group on Visceral Obesity.

Nat Rev Endocrinol 16 , — Download citation. Accepted : 05 December Published : 04 February Issue Date : March Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:.

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Skip to main content Thank you for visiting nature. nature nature reviews endocrinology consensus statements article. Download PDF. Subjects Disease prevention Metabolic syndrome Obesity Predictive markers. Abstract Despite decades of unequivocal evidence that waist circumference provides both independent and additive information to BMI for predicting morbidity and risk of death, this measurement is not routinely obtained in clinical practice.

Introduction The prevalence of adult overweight and obesity as defined using BMI has increased worldwide since the s, with no country demonstrating any successful declines in the 33 years of recorded data 1.

Methodology This Consensus Statement is designed to provide the consensus of the IAS and ICCR Working Group Supplementary Information on waist circumference as an anthropometric measure that improves patient management. Historical perspective The importance of body fat distribution as a risk factor for several diseases for example, CVD, hypertension, stroke and T2DM and mortality has been recognized for several decades.

Prevalence of abdominal obesity Despite a strong association between waist circumference and BMI at the population level, emerging evidence suggests that, across populations, waist circumference might be increasing beyond what is expected according to BMI.

Full size image. Identifying the high-risk obesity phenotype Waist circumference, BMI and health outcomes — categorical analysis It is not surprising that waist circumference and BMI alone are positively associated with morbidity 15 and mortality 13 independent of age, sex and ethnicity, given the strong association between these anthropometric variables across cohorts.

Waist circumference, BMI and health outcomes — continuous analysis Despite the observation that the association between waist circumference and adverse health risk varies across BMI categories 11 , current obesity-risk classification systems recommend using the same waist circumference threshold values for all BMI categories Importance in clinical settings For practitioners, the decision to include a novel measure in clinical practice is driven in large part by two important, yet very different questions.

Risk prediction The evaluation of the utility of any biomarker, such as waist circumference, for risk prediction requires a thorough understanding of the epidemiological context in which the risk assessment is evaluated. Risk reduction Whether the addition of waist circumference improves the prognostic performance of established risk algorithms is a clinically relevant question that remains to be answered; however, the effect of targeting waist circumference on morbidity and mortality is an entirely different issue of equal or greater clinical relevance.

A highly responsive vital sign Evidence from several reviews and meta-analyses confirm that, regardless of age and sex, a decrease in energy intake through diet or an increase in energy expenditure through exercise is associated with a substantial reduction in waist circumference 78 , 79 , 80 , 81 , 82 , 83 , 84 , 85 , 86 , Measurement of waist circumference The emergence of waist circumference as a strong independent marker of morbidity and mortality is striking given that there is no consensus regarding the optimal protocol for measurement of waist circumference.

Conclusions and recommendations — measurement of waist circumference Currently, no consensus exists on the optimal protocol for measurement of waist circumference and little scientific rationale is provided for any of the waist circumference protocols recommended by leading health authorities.

Threshold values to estimate risk Current guidelines for identifying obesity indicate that adverse health risk increases when moving from normal weight to obese BMI categories.

Table 1 Waist circumference thresholds Full size table. Table 2 Ethnicity-specific thresholds Full size table. Conclusions The main recommendation of this Consensus Statement is that waist circumference should be routinely measured in clinical practice, as it can provide additional information for guiding patient management.

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Download references. We are grateful to Abigail Page, Wu Liu and two anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments on the manuscript. We thank Laura Rojas, Angie Ramos, Ángela Valderrama, Valentina West, Sergio Camelo, Laura Quintero, Paula Garzón, María Aguirre, Andrea Pastrana, Nicola Caro, Irene Olivella.

Luisa Ramírez, Laura Guarín, y Henry Segura for their help in data collection in Colombia, and all our participants. This project was funded in Colombia by Colciencias [grant number CI to JDL] and Universidad El Bosque, Vice-rectory of Research [grant number PCI.

Logistics and data collection in Mexico were supported by UNAM-PAPIIT [grant numbers IA, IA] and CONACYT Ciencia Básica [grant number ]. Present address: LH Bailey Hortorium, Plant Biology Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States of America. Present address: Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Los Andes University, Bogota, Colombia.

Human Behaviour Lab, Faculty of Psychology, Universidad El Bosque, Bogota, Colombia. Juan David Leongómez, Oscar R. Experimental Psychology Lab, Faculty of Psychology, Universidad El Bosque, Bogota, Colombia. Laboratory of Learning and Adaptation, Faculty of Psychology, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico.

Neuroecology Lab, Faculty of Psychology, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico. You can also search for this author in PubMed Google Scholar. and I. conceived and designed this study. collected data. analysed all data. wrote the first draft. All authors contributed to writing, approved the final version of the manuscript and gave approval for publication.

Correspondence to Juan David Leongómez or Isaac González-Santoyo. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.

Reprints and permissions. Self-reported Health is Related to Body Height and Waist Circumference in Rural Indigenous and Urbanised Latin-American Populations. Sci Rep 10 , Download citation. Received : 14 June Accepted : 12 February Published : 09 March Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:.

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Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily. Skip to main content Thank you for visiting nature. nature scientific reports articles article. Download PDF. Subjects Biological anthropology Human behaviour.

Abstract Body height is a life-history component. Introduction In modern Western societies, it has been seen that women usually prefer men who are significantly taller than average 1 , 2 , 3 , while men are more tolerant in choosing women who are taller or shorter than average 4. Methods All procedures for testing and recruitment were approved by Universidad El Bosque Institutional Committee on Research Ethics PCI.

Participants A total of adults women and men participated in this study. Procedure All participants signed the informed consent and completed the health and background questionnaires. Self-reported health In order to obtain a standardised value of self-perception of health, we implemented in all three populations the Short Form 36 health survey SF; RAND Corp.

Anthropometric measurements All anthropometric measurements were measured thrice and subsequently averaged to obtain the mean value for agreement statistics between the three measurements of each characteristic, see section 1. Statistical analysis We used linear models LM to test the association between height and self-reported health.

Descriptives Descriptive statistics of age, waist circumference, hip, height, weight, fat percentage, visceral fat, BMI, muscle percentage and self-reported health and reported in Table 1. Table 1 Descriptive statistics of measured variables of all participants. Full size table. Figure 1.

Full size image. Table 2 Results of separate LMs testing effects of independent variables on self-reported health. Figure 2. Table 3 Performance criteria of the three selected models. Table 4 Results of the final LMM testing effects of independent variables on self-reported health.

Figure 3. Discussion The present study provides new insights into the relationship between height and health in men and women by studying three Latin-American populations, which included urban and indigenous populations with marked differences in access to basic needs and services like food and health.

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Article Google Scholar Download references. Acknowledgements We are grateful to Abigail Page, Wu Liu and two anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments on the manuscript.

Author information Author notes Eugenio Valderrama Present address: LH Bailey Hortorium, Plant Biology Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States of America Lina Morales-Sánchez Present address: Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Los Andes University, Bogota, Colombia Authors and Affiliations Human Behaviour Lab, Faculty of Psychology, Universidad El Bosque, Bogota, Colombia Juan David Leongómez, Oscar R.

View author publications. Ethics declarations Competing interests The authors declare no competing interests. Supplementary information. Supplementary Material.

Rights and permissions Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4. About this article. Cite this article Leongómez, J. Copy to clipboard. This article is cited by The Interacting Effects of Height and Shoulder-to-Hip Ratio on Perceptions of Attractiveness, Masculinity, and Fighting Ability: Experimental Design and Ecological Validity Considerations Farid Pazhoohi Ray Garza Alan Kingstone Archives of Sexual Behavior Comments By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines.

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Why Your Middle Is a Measure of Health Risk. Your waist circumference is an important number ccircumference know, Iron in marine applications if you're living with a Waisr health issue Resilient Power Systems as Natural ways to boost metabolism disease or have a risk Waist circumference and self-image for diabetes anf, such self-iamge Ideal eating schedule history. In fact, research shows cjrcumference circumference may be as important as body mass index BMI —the ratio of weight to height that can indicate obesity —for predicting disease risk and overall health status. This is because BMI does not account for how fat is distributed in the body. In contrast, a large waist circumference indicates an accumulation of fat in the intra-abdominal region—and fat in this area can impact internal organs and is more metabolically active than fat in other areas of the body. A person with a larger waist-to-hip ratio faces an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, regardless of whether or not they are overweight. Waist circumference and self-image

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