Category: Diet

Citrus aurantium for menopause support

Citrus aurantium for menopause support

Kasper S, Gastpar Aurnatium, Müller WE, Volz HP, Möller HJ, Dienel A, et al. One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of lavender for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women. We use cookies to improve your experience.

Citrus aurantium for menopause support -

One study investigated the effect of IU of vitamin E for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran. In terms of side effects, 5 women Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin that is thought to function as an antioxidant in the body.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that vitamin E can help with menopausal symptoms. However, there is currently insufficient empirical evidence to conclude that vitamin E is effective and safe for psychological symptoms of menopause.

One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of bitter orange for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women in Iran. When compared to the control, bitter orange significantly reduced the mean state-anxiety scores. The following side effects were reported: nausea 4. There have been no previous studies on the effects of bitter orange consumption in postmenopausal women.

However, one study has found that ingested bitter orange can help reduce preoperative anxiety [ 24 ]. More research is needed in this field to determine the effectiveness and safety of its use. One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of lavender for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women.

Lavender significantly reduced the mean state-anxiety scores compared with the control. The following side effects were reported: nausea 8. This is consistent with previous trials that found lavender to be effective in reducing anxiety and well tolerated, with gastrointestinal side effects being the most commonly reported side effect [ 26 , 27 , 28 ].

More research is needed to determine the effectiveness and safety of its use. Schisandra chinensis. The effects of S. A study found a significant reduction in hot flushes and night sweats after using mg of natural S. chinensis extract for 6 weeks, but not in psychological symptoms such as nervousness and depression.

There were no adverse events observed [ 30 ]. More research is needed to determine its efficacy due to the small number of studies and insufficient information. A more remarkable improvement was observed in the high-dose group compared to low dose and placebo [ 31 ]. The effects of proanthocyanidin which does not bind to estrogen receptors on menopausal symptoms have been attributed to its antioxidant activity; however, the precise mechanism remains unknown [ 32 ].

Because of the small number of studies and insufficient information, more research is required to determine its efficacy and safety. Maca Lepidium meyenii. Maca, an Andean plant of the brassica mustard family, has been used for centuries to treat infertility and female hormone balance [ 33 ].

Our systematic review identified 2 RCTs that investigated the effects of maca on psychological symptoms in 94 women at various stages of menopause.

Each of these trials found that maca had a positive effect on menopausal symptoms. Significant reductions in depression and anxiety were observed after six weeks of treatment with different doses of 3. Despite preliminary evidence for maca's benefits, findings were limited by a small number of sample sizes and a lack of safety data.

More research is needed to determine the efficacy and safety of maca in the treatment of psychological symptoms of menopause. Er-Xian decoction is a Chinese herbal composed of different herbs that was initially designed and named by Zhang Bo-na in [ 36 ]. According to the findings of one trial conducted by Zhong et al.

There were no reports of serious adverse events. The efficacy of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms was previously reported in a systematic review. Despite the fact that the results of that study showed that Er-Xian decoction significantly improved at least one menopausal symptom.

The reviewers concluded, however, that the findings were limited by the low quality of the investigated studies, the lack of double-blind controlled trials, and the lack of proper randomization procedures [ 38 ].

Thus, current research does not provide enough evidence to support the efficacy of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

More research is needed to determine the efficacy and safety of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Wild yam Dioscorea. Wild yam is a tonic nourishment that is high in ascorbic acid and protein; it is a tuber that has traditionally been used in Chinese medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including menopausal symptoms [ 39 ].

However, the evidence for the effects of wild yam on menopausal symptoms is limited. Significant improvement was seen in psychological symptoms of 50 menopausal women following the use of 12 mg wild yam twice a day for 12 months with no adverse events [ 40 ].

More research is needed to determine the efficacy of wild yam due to the small number of studies and insufficient information regarding long-term effects.

Black cohosh Cimicifuga racemosa. A previous systematic review of 16 RCTs that assessed the effects of oral black cohosh on somatic symptoms in 2, menopausal women found insufficient evidence to support the use of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms [ 41 ].

In our review, the results of a study evaluating the effect of black cohosh on psychological symptoms of 34 menopausal women revealed that black cohosh had no statistically significant effect on anxiety. Arthralgia and edema were reported in one person 5.

In a second RCT comparing black cohosh extract with St John's wort to placebo in menopausal women, the level of depression significantly decreased compared to placebo [ 17 ]. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this study if black cohosh is beneficial on its own or in combination with other herbs.

Combination of Danggui Angelicae sinensis and Huang Qi Astragalus membranaceus. Danggui, a traditional Chinese herb, is commonly used in conjunction with other herbs to treat menopausal problems [ 43 ].

However, in a RCT comparing Danggui combined with Huang Qi to placebo in women, there were no significant differences in the psychological domain of the Menopause Specific Quality of Life in those who received treatment versus those who did not [ 44 ].

Phytoestrogens are non-steroidal plant-derived compounds derived from various herbs that may produce estrogen effects [ 45 ]. According to the findings of a meta-analysis on the efficacy of phytoestrogens on menopausal symptoms, phytoestrogens appear to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flushes without causing adverse events [ 46 ].

We identified 8 studies on the effect of phytoestrogen-based herbal medicine on psychological symptoms of menopausal women in our review.

The effect of a Korean botanical herb called EstroG containing 0. Heger et al. The result of a study by Hirose et al.

The result of another trial conducted by Steels et al. Shakeri et al. However, the findings of a study conducted by Carmignani et al. Another study also found that treatment with 30 mg of pomegranate seed oil containing kg of steroidal phytoestrogens per dose for six weeks had no effect on menopausal psychological symptoms [ 54 ].

While the majority of evidence suggests that phytoestrogens are safe and effective for alleviating psychological symptoms of menopause, more RCTs using standardized methods that allow for study comparison are thus required in order to draw definitive conclusions about their use.

Aromatherapy, also known as essential oil therapy, is thought to reduce anxiety and increase relaxation, which may be beneficial in alleviating stressful menopausal symptoms [ 55 ]. Bakhtiari et al. Aromatherapy combined with other CAM interventions may provide additional symptom relief.

Another study by Taavoni et al. There is, however, insufficient evidence to support aromatherapy as a stand-alone treatment to manage the psychological symptoms of menopause. All three studies that examined the effect of yoga on psychological symptoms in women found it to be beneficial with no negative side effects [ 1 , 59 , 60 ].

Elavsky and McAuley [ 1 ] found that a minute yoga session twice a week for four months reduced psychological symptoms of menopause. Another study found that 75 minutes of supervised yoga practice twice a week for 12 weeks reduced stress levels and depression of menopausal women [ 59 ].

Joshi et al. This is consistent with a systematic review and meta-analysis that concluded that there was moderate evidence for the short-term effects of yoga on psychological symptoms in menopause [ 61 ].

Yoga appears to be safe and may be effective for psychological symptoms, according to a review of research.

Four studies evaluated the effect of exercise and physical activity on different psychological symptoms of menopausal women. A walking program three times a week for one hour in a large gymnasium on menopausal symptoms over a four-month period was found to be effective in improving mental health and reducing psychological symptoms in participants [ 1 ].

Another study examined the effect of a week training program that included 75 minutes of supervised stretching for the shoulder girdle, cervical muscles, and lower legs twice a week.

The result showed no significant effect on the level of anxiety and depression of participants compared to the control group. No adverse events were reported during the protocol [ 59 ].

Another study examined the effect of pedometer-based walking on depression and anxiety in postmenopausal women. The intervention group's anxiety and depression levels were found to be lower [ 62 ].

Sternfeld et al. The findings revealed small but not statistically significant improvements in depressive symptoms [ 63 ].

Although a systematic review and meta-analysis found that exercise programs are a viable treatment option for anxiety [ 64 ], the inconsistent findings of trials in this review necessitate further research to determine the efficacy of exercise for psychological symptoms of menopause.

Three studies evaluated the effect of massage therapy on psychological symptoms of menopausal women. Espí-López et al. Lotfipur Rafsanjani et al.

There is debate about whether there are true predictors of positive outcomes in clinical trial interventions. One of the predictors that may taint the outcomes of massage therapy, for example, is communication between the therapist and the participants, which may bias the results. Two studies investigated the effect of 15—30 min foot reflexology for 12—19 sessions on menopausal women.

According to a recent study conducted by Mahdavipour et al. Another study, however, found no statistically significant differences in anxiety and depression symptoms between nonspecific foot massage and reflexology [ 67 ].

Because of inconsistent findings, more research is needed to determine the efficacy of reflexology for psychological symptoms of menopause.

One study investigated the short-and long-term effects of acupuncture on the quality of life-related measures of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. The findings revealed that acupuncture had a significant positive effect on memory and anxiety, and these benefits lasted for 6 months after treatment ended [ 68 ].

This is consistent with some previous trials that showed the effectiveness of acupuncture for alleviating psychological symptoms including anxiety in different target groups [ 69 , 70 ].

A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of anxiety disorder found that acupuncture is safe and effective for the treatment of anxiety disorder [ 71 ]. More research using precise methods is needed to determine the true efficacy of acupuncture and the mechanisms underlying the benefit that some participants receive.

As with any systematic review, the current study has some limitations. The risk of bias of some of the included RCTs was considerable; additionally, selection biases, which are potential threats to all systematic reviews, may exist.

It is nearly impossible to blind participants, intervention providers, and outcome assessors in some studies that use interventions such as yoga, exercise, massage, aromatherapy, reflexology, and acupuncture, which may affect the results.

The majority of the studies were constrained by outcome questionnaires and sample size. The majority of study questionnaires were self-reported, and some trials had a small sample size.

Because most trials focused on the short-term effects, the long-term effects of such interventions are not well established. Limiting systematic reviews to English-only is also the limitation of our study, which can lead to biased effect estimates and reduce generalizability.

Despite the positive effect of various CAM interventions on reducing psychological symptoms, necessary precautions should be taken when using them in the clinical setting.

More research with a higher methodology quality is required to make better decisions about the effect of various CAM interventions on psychological symptoms of menopause. CONFLICT OF INTEREST: No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. Copy and paste a formatted citation from below or use one of the hyperlinks at the bottom to download a file for import into a bibliography manager.

Home Archive v. Published online Dec 14, Efficacy of the Complementary and Alternative Therapies for the Management of Psychological Symptoms of Menopause: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials. Vahid Mehrnoush, 1 Fatemeh Darsareh , 2 Nasibeh Roozbeh, 2 and Avan Ziraeie 2.

Author information. Author notes. Copyright and License. Address for Correspondence: Fatemeh Darsareh, Mother and Child Welfare Research Center, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Jomhuri Eslami Blvd, Bandar Abbas , Iran. Tel: , Email: famadarsareh yahoo.

Received June 29, ; Revised September 27, ; Accepted November 14, Go to:. Alternative medicine ; Complementary medicine ; Menopause ; Psychology ; Systematic review. Click for larger image Download as PowerPoint slide.

Table 1 Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool MMAT Click for larger image Click for full table Download as Excel file.

Table 2 Summary of trials Click for larger image Click for full table Download as Excel file. Herbal and dietary supplements Evening primrose oil A result of a study investigating the effect of 1, mg of daily evening primrose oil EPO for eight weeks on psychological symptoms of menopausal women found significant improvements in the psychological symptoms after treatment compared to placebo.

Curcumin One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of daily curcumin for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran. Vitamin E One study investigated the effect of IU of vitamin E for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran.

Bitter orange One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of bitter orange for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women in Iran. Lavender One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of lavender for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women. Maca Lepidium meyenii Maca, an Andean plant of the brassica mustard family, has been used for centuries to treat infertility and female hormone balance [ 33 ].

Er-Xian decoction Er-Xian decoction is a Chinese herbal composed of different herbs that was initially designed and named by Zhang Bo-na in [ 36 ]. Wild yam Dioscorea Wild yam is a tonic nourishment that is high in ascorbic acid and protein; it is a tuber that has traditionally been used in Chinese medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including menopausal symptoms [ 39 ].

Black cohosh Cimicifuga racemosa A previous systematic review of 16 RCTs that assessed the effects of oral black cohosh on somatic symptoms in 2, menopausal women found insufficient evidence to support the use of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms [ 41 ].

Combination of Danggui Angelicae sinensis and Huang Qi Astragalus membranaceus Danggui, a traditional Chinese herb, is commonly used in conjunction with other herbs to treat menopausal problems [ 43 ].

Phytoestrogens Phytoestrogens are non-steroidal plant-derived compounds derived from various herbs that may produce estrogen effects [ 45 ]. Aromatherapy Aromatherapy, also known as essential oil therapy, is thought to reduce anxiety and increase relaxation, which may be beneficial in alleviating stressful menopausal symptoms [ 55 ].

Yoga All three studies that examined the effect of yoga on psychological symptoms in women found it to be beneficial with no negative side effects [ 1 , 59 , 60 ]. Exercise Four studies evaluated the effect of exercise and physical activity on different psychological symptoms of menopausal women.

Massage Three studies evaluated the effect of massage therapy on psychological symptoms of menopausal women. Reflexology Two studies investigated the effect of 15—30 min foot reflexology for 12—19 sessions on menopausal women. Acupuncture One study investigated the short-and long-term effects of acupuncture on the quality of life-related measures of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

Limitation As with any systematic review, the current study has some limitations. Elavsky S, McAuley E. Physical activity and mental health outcomes during menopause: a randomized controlled trial.

Jojoba oil may have a funny-sounding name, but it's powers for the skin, body, and hair are certainly no joke. The content in this article is for informational and educational purposes only and is not intended to take the place of medical advice. Please consult your personal physician for any advice or treatment regarding specific health questions.

Neither the article editor, writer, nor the organisation of Nikura takes any responsibility for possible health consequences following the information given in any article. All readers should consult their physician before taking any advice given within these articles.

We use strictly necessary cookies to personalise your site experience. You can learn more here. format selected. Your Basket. quantity--" click. update { updates: { [item.

id]: item. Back to blog. Choose a topic All topics Blog Home Business Guides Learn about Essential Oils Living Well Make at Home Beginners Guides Festive Blog Home Business Guides Learn about Essential Oils Living Well Make at Home Beginners Guides Festive. Essential Oils menopause self care. In medical terms, menopause begins when a woman has gone 12 consecutive months without a menstrual period due to lower hormone levels.

What are the best essential oils for menopause? Use Clary Sage to control hot flushes Hot flushes are a common symptom of menopause and applying an essential oil like Clary Sage could help to cool the sudden change in body temperature.

Peppermint can create a calming sensation One of the most popular essential oils for menopause is Peppermint Oil, which can help to calm you when experiencing a hot flush.

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Aromatherapy benefits carrier oil Haircare Skincare. carrier oil coconut oil guides Natural Remedies Skincare. Candle making candle wax Candle wick Candles.

candle holders Candle making candle wax Candles. business Candles clp labels compliance crafting. crafting Essential Oils Fragrance oils notes Perfume. business DIY packaging soap Soap making. Some essential oils have been found to provide relief when applied on different areas of the body.

These oils come from many different plant sources and can often be found in their natural form. Essential oils are used in aromatherapy. The essence of these oils is meant to be inhaled directly or through a difuser or diluted and applied to the skin.

Essential oils should not be ingested. Hot flashes are a quick sensation of heat that pulsates throughout your body. These may be naturally remedied by rubbing three drops of diluted clary sage oil across the back of your neck or all over your feet. For even quicker relief, consider adding a few drops to a tissue or napkin and inhaling and exhaling softly.

This allows the oil to enter your body through your nose. This process can also produce antidepressantlike effects. Clary sage is also thought to help slow the development of osteoporosis. Women experiencing menopause have an increased risk for osteoporosis due to a decline in estrogen.

During this time, bone breakdown overtakes bone development. Peppermint oil may also reduce your discomfort when experiencing hot flashes. Add no more than two drops to a tissue. Hold the tissue up to your nose while breathing slowly.

This oil may also help relieve any cramping you may experience during this time. Some women may continue to experience cramps once menstruation has ceased completely.

This may be a sign of an underlying medical condition. Lavender may help balance your hormones and soothe perineal discomfort.

If the area around your perineum feels tight or otherwise uncomfortable, you may consider placing a cold compress on the area. You can add one drop of diluted lavender oil to the compress for additional relief. If you experience any stinging or burning, you should remove the compress and rinse the area with water.

Lavender can also promote feelings of relaxation and help improve the quality of your sleep. During this time, insomnia and other sleep-related problems are common.

You may find it beneficial to add lavender aromatherapy to your nighttime routine. Geranium used as an essential oil has also been found to help menopausal women manage hormonal changes. One to two drops may be inhaled from a napkin for immediate stress relief. Geranium is also helpful for dry skin.

Consider adding a few drops of the diluted oil to the water during a relaxing, hot bath. Basil can also be helpful against hot flashes when diluted and applied to your feet or rubbed across the back of your neck.

Citrus oil aromatherapy is said to have a number of health benefits for women experiencing symptoms of menopause. Researchers in a study found the postmenopausal women who inhaled this essential oil experienced fewer physical symptoms and an increase in sexual desire.

Citdus institution may have access to this Citrus aurantium for menopause support. Find your institution then sign in to continue. Fkr found a match Your institution may have access to this item. Title Effects of Inhalation of Essential Oil of Citrus aurantium L. amara on Menopausal Symptoms, Stress, and Estrogen in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Your institution may have access to this item. Find your akrantium Citrus aurantium for menopause support Guarana Weight Loss in to continue. Aurajtium found airantium match Your institution may have access to this item.

Title Effects of Inhalation of Emnopause Oil of Citrus aurantium L. aurwntium on Menopausal Symptoms, Stress, and Estrogen in Postmenopausal Supoort A Randomized Controlled Citrua.

Authors Seo Yeon Choi; Purum Fueling for explosive power before competition Hui Supoort Lee; Geun Hee Citrus aurantium for menopause support Abstract This study aimed to investigate the ssupport Citrus aurantium for menopause support inhalation of the Fog oil of Citrus aurantium L.

amara neroli oil on menopausal symptoms, stress, and estrogen in postmenopausal women. Sixty-three healthy postmenopausal women were randomized to inhale 0.

Menopause-related symptoms, as determined by the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire MENQOL ; sexual desire visual analog scale VAS ; serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations, blood pressure, pulse, and stress VAS, were measured before and after inhalation.

Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significant improvements in the physical domain score of the MENQOL and in sexual desire. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the group inhaling 0. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significantly lower diastolic blood pressure and tended to improve pulse rate and serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations.

These findings indicate that inhalation of neroli oil helps relieve menopausal symptoms, increase sexual desire, and reduce blood pressure in postmenopausal women.

Neroli oil may have potential as an effective intervention to reduce stress and improve the endocrine system.

: Citrus aurantium for menopause support

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Basil can also be helpful against hot flashes when diluted and applied to your feet or rubbed across the back of your neck. Citrus oil aromatherapy is said to have a number of health benefits for women experiencing symptoms of menopause. Researchers in a study found the postmenopausal women who inhaled this essential oil experienced fewer physical symptoms and an increase in sexual desire.

In addition to a decrease in systolic blood pressure, they also experienced an improved pulse rate and estrogen concentrations. Citrus also has anti-inflammatory properties, which may help with any aches and pains you may be experiencing.

Take care with citrus oils, they make your skin sun sensitive. Avoid direct sunlight if applying diluted citrus oils to your skin. Speak with your doctor before using essential oils for menopausal relief. Your doctor will be able to tell you if the oils will affect any medications that you may be taking.

You should also check with your doctor if you have any known allergies, as some oils may contain potential allergens. Coconut, jojoba, and olive oils are common carrier oils. A good rule of thumb is to add 1 ounce of carrier oil to every 12 drops of essential oil and mix.

You should always perform a patch test before doing a full application. To do this, apply the diluted oil to a small area of skin.

The inside of the arm is generally a good location for this. Wait 24 hours to see if your skin experiences any inflammation or irritation.

If you do, discontinue use. If nothing happens, it should be OK for you to do a full application. When you first start having menopausal symptoms, you should make an appointment with your doctor. Your doctor can give you helpful information as you begin your menopausal journey. Drug therapy is typically used to treat symptoms of menopause.

For many women, this may mean hormone therapy. Hormone therapy is the most effective treatment for hot flashes and night sweats. You may take doses of estrogen in pill, patch, gel, or cream form.

Some women may also need to take progestin. Estrogen can also relieve vaginal dryness. The hormone can be applied directly to the vagina via a low-dose tablet, ring, or cream. The estrogen is absorbed into the vaginal tissue.

Several medications are available for hot flash relief, including antidepressants and gabapentin Neurontin. Your doctor may also make fitness and dietary recommendations.

Certain lifestyle changes may also help reduce symptoms. Check out: Menopause diet ». Menopause is a time of extreme change, but it can be manageable. EPO is a commonly used alternative therapy with a rich source of omega-3 essential fatty acids linoleic acid and gamma-linolenic acid [ 10 ].

Although there is insufficient evidence to support the use of EPO for somatic symptoms of menopause such as hot flushes [ 11 , 12 ], its effectiveness and safety for mental health have been confirmed in several studies [ 13 , 14 ].

Longer trials are required to make more reliable decisions about the use and safety of EPO in clinical practice. Two studies, one in Iran and the other in Germany, examined the effect of St. Both studies found that treatment with St. The efficacy of St. It has been proposed that St. One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of daily curcumin for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran.

There were no significant changes in anxiety levels after treatment. In terms of side effects, gastric pain was reported in 5 women Curcumin, a type of polyphenol found in turmeric, is derived from the powdered roots of the Curcumalonga plant.

Because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, curcumin is being recognized and used in a variety of forms around the world for a variety of potential health benefits [ 22 ].

Longer trials are needed, however, to make more reliable decisions about the use and safety of curcumin in clinical practice. One study investigated the effect of IU of vitamin E for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran. In terms of side effects, 5 women Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin that is thought to function as an antioxidant in the body.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that vitamin E can help with menopausal symptoms. However, there is currently insufficient empirical evidence to conclude that vitamin E is effective and safe for psychological symptoms of menopause.

One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of bitter orange for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women in Iran. When compared to the control, bitter orange significantly reduced the mean state-anxiety scores. The following side effects were reported: nausea 4.

There have been no previous studies on the effects of bitter orange consumption in postmenopausal women. However, one study has found that ingested bitter orange can help reduce preoperative anxiety [ 24 ]. More research is needed in this field to determine the effectiveness and safety of its use.

One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of lavender for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women. Lavender significantly reduced the mean state-anxiety scores compared with the control. The following side effects were reported: nausea 8.

This is consistent with previous trials that found lavender to be effective in reducing anxiety and well tolerated, with gastrointestinal side effects being the most commonly reported side effect [ 26 , 27 , 28 ]. More research is needed to determine the effectiveness and safety of its use.

Schisandra chinensis. The effects of S. A study found a significant reduction in hot flushes and night sweats after using mg of natural S. chinensis extract for 6 weeks, but not in psychological symptoms such as nervousness and depression.

There were no adverse events observed [ 30 ]. More research is needed to determine its efficacy due to the small number of studies and insufficient information.

A more remarkable improvement was observed in the high-dose group compared to low dose and placebo [ 31 ]. The effects of proanthocyanidin which does not bind to estrogen receptors on menopausal symptoms have been attributed to its antioxidant activity; however, the precise mechanism remains unknown [ 32 ].

Because of the small number of studies and insufficient information, more research is required to determine its efficacy and safety. Maca Lepidium meyenii. Maca, an Andean plant of the brassica mustard family, has been used for centuries to treat infertility and female hormone balance [ 33 ].

Our systematic review identified 2 RCTs that investigated the effects of maca on psychological symptoms in 94 women at various stages of menopause.

Each of these trials found that maca had a positive effect on menopausal symptoms. Significant reductions in depression and anxiety were observed after six weeks of treatment with different doses of 3.

Despite preliminary evidence for maca's benefits, findings were limited by a small number of sample sizes and a lack of safety data. More research is needed to determine the efficacy and safety of maca in the treatment of psychological symptoms of menopause.

Er-Xian decoction is a Chinese herbal composed of different herbs that was initially designed and named by Zhang Bo-na in [ 36 ]. According to the findings of one trial conducted by Zhong et al.

There were no reports of serious adverse events. The efficacy of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms was previously reported in a systematic review.

Despite the fact that the results of that study showed that Er-Xian decoction significantly improved at least one menopausal symptom. The reviewers concluded, however, that the findings were limited by the low quality of the investigated studies, the lack of double-blind controlled trials, and the lack of proper randomization procedures [ 38 ].

Thus, current research does not provide enough evidence to support the efficacy of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. More research is needed to determine the efficacy and safety of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

Wild yam Dioscorea. Wild yam is a tonic nourishment that is high in ascorbic acid and protein; it is a tuber that has traditionally been used in Chinese medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including menopausal symptoms [ 39 ].

However, the evidence for the effects of wild yam on menopausal symptoms is limited. Significant improvement was seen in psychological symptoms of 50 menopausal women following the use of 12 mg wild yam twice a day for 12 months with no adverse events [ 40 ].

More research is needed to determine the efficacy of wild yam due to the small number of studies and insufficient information regarding long-term effects. Black cohosh Cimicifuga racemosa. A previous systematic review of 16 RCTs that assessed the effects of oral black cohosh on somatic symptoms in 2, menopausal women found insufficient evidence to support the use of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms [ 41 ].

In our review, the results of a study evaluating the effect of black cohosh on psychological symptoms of 34 menopausal women revealed that black cohosh had no statistically significant effect on anxiety. Arthralgia and edema were reported in one person 5. In a second RCT comparing black cohosh extract with St John's wort to placebo in menopausal women, the level of depression significantly decreased compared to placebo [ 17 ].

It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this study if black cohosh is beneficial on its own or in combination with other herbs. Combination of Danggui Angelicae sinensis and Huang Qi Astragalus membranaceus. Danggui, a traditional Chinese herb, is commonly used in conjunction with other herbs to treat menopausal problems [ 43 ].

However, in a RCT comparing Danggui combined with Huang Qi to placebo in women, there were no significant differences in the psychological domain of the Menopause Specific Quality of Life in those who received treatment versus those who did not [ 44 ].

Phytoestrogens are non-steroidal plant-derived compounds derived from various herbs that may produce estrogen effects [ 45 ]. According to the findings of a meta-analysis on the efficacy of phytoestrogens on menopausal symptoms, phytoestrogens appear to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flushes without causing adverse events [ 46 ].

We identified 8 studies on the effect of phytoestrogen-based herbal medicine on psychological symptoms of menopausal women in our review. The effect of a Korean botanical herb called EstroG containing 0.

Heger et al. The result of a study by Hirose et al. The result of another trial conducted by Steels et al. Shakeri et al. However, the findings of a study conducted by Carmignani et al.

Another study also found that treatment with 30 mg of pomegranate seed oil containing kg of steroidal phytoestrogens per dose for six weeks had no effect on menopausal psychological symptoms [ 54 ]. While the majority of evidence suggests that phytoestrogens are safe and effective for alleviating psychological symptoms of menopause, more RCTs using standardized methods that allow for study comparison are thus required in order to draw definitive conclusions about their use.

Aromatherapy, also known as essential oil therapy, is thought to reduce anxiety and increase relaxation, which may be beneficial in alleviating stressful menopausal symptoms [ 55 ].

Bakhtiari et al. Aromatherapy combined with other CAM interventions may provide additional symptom relief. Another study by Taavoni et al. There is, however, insufficient evidence to support aromatherapy as a stand-alone treatment to manage the psychological symptoms of menopause.

All three studies that examined the effect of yoga on psychological symptoms in women found it to be beneficial with no negative side effects [ 1 , 59 , 60 ]. Elavsky and McAuley [ 1 ] found that a minute yoga session twice a week for four months reduced psychological symptoms of menopause.

Another study found that 75 minutes of supervised yoga practice twice a week for 12 weeks reduced stress levels and depression of menopausal women [ 59 ].

Joshi et al. This is consistent with a systematic review and meta-analysis that concluded that there was moderate evidence for the short-term effects of yoga on psychological symptoms in menopause [ 61 ]. Yoga appears to be safe and may be effective for psychological symptoms, according to a review of research.

Four studies evaluated the effect of exercise and physical activity on different psychological symptoms of menopausal women. A walking program three times a week for one hour in a large gymnasium on menopausal symptoms over a four-month period was found to be effective in improving mental health and reducing psychological symptoms in participants [ 1 ].

Another study examined the effect of a week training program that included 75 minutes of supervised stretching for the shoulder girdle, cervical muscles, and lower legs twice a week.

The result showed no significant effect on the level of anxiety and depression of participants compared to the control group. No adverse events were reported during the protocol [ 59 ].

Another study examined the effect of pedometer-based walking on depression and anxiety in postmenopausal women.

The intervention group's anxiety and depression levels were found to be lower [ 62 ]. Sternfeld et al. The findings revealed small but not statistically significant improvements in depressive symptoms [ 63 ]. Although a systematic review and meta-analysis found that exercise programs are a viable treatment option for anxiety [ 64 ], the inconsistent findings of trials in this review necessitate further research to determine the efficacy of exercise for psychological symptoms of menopause.

Three studies evaluated the effect of massage therapy on psychological symptoms of menopausal women. Espí-López et al. Lotfipur Rafsanjani et al. There is debate about whether there are true predictors of positive outcomes in clinical trial interventions. One of the predictors that may taint the outcomes of massage therapy, for example, is communication between the therapist and the participants, which may bias the results.

Two studies investigated the effect of 15—30 min foot reflexology for 12—19 sessions on menopausal women. According to a recent study conducted by Mahdavipour et al. Another study, however, found no statistically significant differences in anxiety and depression symptoms between nonspecific foot massage and reflexology [ 67 ].

Because of inconsistent findings, more research is needed to determine the efficacy of reflexology for psychological symptoms of menopause. One study investigated the short-and long-term effects of acupuncture on the quality of life-related measures of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

The findings revealed that acupuncture had a significant positive effect on memory and anxiety, and these benefits lasted for 6 months after treatment ended [ 68 ].

This is consistent with some previous trials that showed the effectiveness of acupuncture for alleviating psychological symptoms including anxiety in different target groups [ 69 , 70 ]. A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of anxiety disorder found that acupuncture is safe and effective for the treatment of anxiety disorder [ 71 ].

More research using precise methods is needed to determine the true efficacy of acupuncture and the mechanisms underlying the benefit that some participants receive. As with any systematic review, the current study has some limitations.

The risk of bias of some of the included RCTs was considerable; additionally, selection biases, which are potential threats to all systematic reviews, may exist. It is nearly impossible to blind participants, intervention providers, and outcome assessors in some studies that use interventions such as yoga, exercise, massage, aromatherapy, reflexology, and acupuncture, which may affect the results.

The majority of the studies were constrained by outcome questionnaires and sample size. The majority of study questionnaires were self-reported, and some trials had a small sample size. Because most trials focused on the short-term effects, the long-term effects of such interventions are not well established.

Limiting systematic reviews to English-only is also the limitation of our study, which can lead to biased effect estimates and reduce generalizability. Despite the positive effect of various CAM interventions on reducing psychological symptoms, necessary precautions should be taken when using them in the clinical setting.

More research with a higher methodology quality is required to make better decisions about the effect of various CAM interventions on psychological symptoms of menopause.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST: No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. Copy and paste a formatted citation from below or use one of the hyperlinks at the bottom to download a file for import into a bibliography manager.

Home Archive v. Published online Dec 14, Efficacy of the Complementary and Alternative Therapies for the Management of Psychological Symptoms of Menopause: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Vahid Mehrnoush, 1 Fatemeh Darsareh , 2 Nasibeh Roozbeh, 2 and Avan Ziraeie 2. Author information. Author notes. Copyright and License. Address for Correspondence: Fatemeh Darsareh, Mother and Child Welfare Research Center, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Jomhuri Eslami Blvd, Bandar Abbas , Iran.

Tel: , Email: famadarsareh yahoo. Received June 29, ; Revised September 27, ; Accepted November 14, Go to:. Alternative medicine ; Complementary medicine ; Menopause ; Psychology ; Systematic review.

Click for larger image Download as PowerPoint slide. Table 1 Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool MMAT Click for larger image Click for full table Download as Excel file.

Table 2 Summary of trials Click for larger image Click for full table Download as Excel file. Herbal and dietary supplements Evening primrose oil A result of a study investigating the effect of 1, mg of daily evening primrose oil EPO for eight weeks on psychological symptoms of menopausal women found significant improvements in the psychological symptoms after treatment compared to placebo.

Curcumin One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of daily curcumin for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran.

Vitamin E One study investigated the effect of IU of vitamin E for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran.

Bitter orange One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of bitter orange for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women in Iran. Lavender One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of lavender for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women.

Maca Lepidium meyenii Maca, an Andean plant of the brassica mustard family, has been used for centuries to treat infertility and female hormone balance [ 33 ]. Er-Xian decoction Er-Xian decoction is a Chinese herbal composed of different herbs that was initially designed and named by Zhang Bo-na in [ 36 ].

Title Effects of Inhalation of Essential Oil of Citrus aurantium L. amara on Menopausal Symptoms, Stress, and Estrogen in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Authors Seo Yeon Choi; Purum Kang; Hui Su Lee; Geun Hee Seol Abstract This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhalation of the essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. amara neroli oil on menopausal symptoms, stress, and estrogen in postmenopausal women.

Seo Yeon Choi; Purum Kang; Hui Su Lee; Geun Hee Seol Invalid Password. Essential Oils menopause self care. Despite the fact that the results of that study showed that Er-Xian decoction significantly improved at least one menopausal symptom. Shakeri F, Taavoni S, Goushegir A, Haghani H. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med ; PubMed CrossRef. Javadivala Z, Allahverdipour H, Asghari Jafarabad M, Emami A. Please return to the product page to specify your selections, and remove this item from cart before checkout.
Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM), 2014, Vol 2014, p1

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Express Shipping:. Receive your order within 1 - 4 business days. Standard Shipping:. Based on the selection criteria, studies were excluded. Then, 63 full-text articles were evaluated for eligibility, and 30 records were excluded due to unrelated outcomes or active control group design. Any disagreements among the reviewers were settled through discussion.

Finally, 33 studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. The quality assessment is presented in Table 1. Table 1 Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool MMAT.

The characteristics of the 33 relevant studies used for qualitative analyses are described in Table 2. The sample sizes in the studies ranged from 34 to menopausal women. Of the trials included in this review, one was a cross over trial and eight had two interventional groups different types of CAM or different doses of the same type of CAM and one control group.

As a result, there were 41 intervention groups and 33 control groups. Herbal and dietary supplements were the most commonly used CAM. Table 2 Summary of trials. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic review solely focused on the psychological symptoms of menopause.

The current study provides evidence for the beneficial effects of different types of CAM on psychological symptoms during menopause. Each therapy will be discussed in detail below. Herbal and dietary supplements.

Evening primrose oil. A result of a study investigating the effect of 1, mg of daily evening primrose oil EPO for eight weeks on psychological symptoms of menopausal women found significant improvements in the psychological symptoms after treatment compared to placebo.

In terms of safety, only one woman 1. EPO is a commonly used alternative therapy with a rich source of omega-3 essential fatty acids linoleic acid and gamma-linolenic acid [ 10 ].

Although there is insufficient evidence to support the use of EPO for somatic symptoms of menopause such as hot flushes [ 11 , 12 ], its effectiveness and safety for mental health have been confirmed in several studies [ 13 , 14 ]. Longer trials are required to make more reliable decisions about the use and safety of EPO in clinical practice.

Two studies, one in Iran and the other in Germany, examined the effect of St. Both studies found that treatment with St. The efficacy of St. It has been proposed that St. One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of daily curcumin for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran.

There were no significant changes in anxiety levels after treatment. In terms of side effects, gastric pain was reported in 5 women Curcumin, a type of polyphenol found in turmeric, is derived from the powdered roots of the Curcumalonga plant.

Because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, curcumin is being recognized and used in a variety of forms around the world for a variety of potential health benefits [ 22 ]. Longer trials are needed, however, to make more reliable decisions about the use and safety of curcumin in clinical practice.

One study investigated the effect of IU of vitamin E for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran. In terms of side effects, 5 women Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin that is thought to function as an antioxidant in the body.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that vitamin E can help with menopausal symptoms. However, there is currently insufficient empirical evidence to conclude that vitamin E is effective and safe for psychological symptoms of menopause.

One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of bitter orange for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women in Iran.

When compared to the control, bitter orange significantly reduced the mean state-anxiety scores. The following side effects were reported: nausea 4. There have been no previous studies on the effects of bitter orange consumption in postmenopausal women.

However, one study has found that ingested bitter orange can help reduce preoperative anxiety [ 24 ]. More research is needed in this field to determine the effectiveness and safety of its use. One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of lavender for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women.

Lavender significantly reduced the mean state-anxiety scores compared with the control. The following side effects were reported: nausea 8. This is consistent with previous trials that found lavender to be effective in reducing anxiety and well tolerated, with gastrointestinal side effects being the most commonly reported side effect [ 26 , 27 , 28 ].

More research is needed to determine the effectiveness and safety of its use. Schisandra chinensis. The effects of S. A study found a significant reduction in hot flushes and night sweats after using mg of natural S. chinensis extract for 6 weeks, but not in psychological symptoms such as nervousness and depression.

There were no adverse events observed [ 30 ]. More research is needed to determine its efficacy due to the small number of studies and insufficient information. A more remarkable improvement was observed in the high-dose group compared to low dose and placebo [ 31 ].

The effects of proanthocyanidin which does not bind to estrogen receptors on menopausal symptoms have been attributed to its antioxidant activity; however, the precise mechanism remains unknown [ 32 ].

Because of the small number of studies and insufficient information, more research is required to determine its efficacy and safety.

Maca Lepidium meyenii. Maca, an Andean plant of the brassica mustard family, has been used for centuries to treat infertility and female hormone balance [ 33 ].

Our systematic review identified 2 RCTs that investigated the effects of maca on psychological symptoms in 94 women at various stages of menopause.

Each of these trials found that maca had a positive effect on menopausal symptoms. Significant reductions in depression and anxiety were observed after six weeks of treatment with different doses of 3.

Despite preliminary evidence for maca's benefits, findings were limited by a small number of sample sizes and a lack of safety data.

More research is needed to determine the efficacy and safety of maca in the treatment of psychological symptoms of menopause.

Er-Xian decoction is a Chinese herbal composed of different herbs that was initially designed and named by Zhang Bo-na in [ 36 ].

According to the findings of one trial conducted by Zhong et al. There were no reports of serious adverse events. The efficacy of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms was previously reported in a systematic review.

Despite the fact that the results of that study showed that Er-Xian decoction significantly improved at least one menopausal symptom. The reviewers concluded, however, that the findings were limited by the low quality of the investigated studies, the lack of double-blind controlled trials, and the lack of proper randomization procedures [ 38 ].

Thus, current research does not provide enough evidence to support the efficacy of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. More research is needed to determine the efficacy and safety of Er-Xian decoction in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

Wild yam Dioscorea. Wild yam is a tonic nourishment that is high in ascorbic acid and protein; it is a tuber that has traditionally been used in Chinese medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including menopausal symptoms [ 39 ]. However, the evidence for the effects of wild yam on menopausal symptoms is limited.

Significant improvement was seen in psychological symptoms of 50 menopausal women following the use of 12 mg wild yam twice a day for 12 months with no adverse events [ 40 ]. More research is needed to determine the efficacy of wild yam due to the small number of studies and insufficient information regarding long-term effects.

Black cohosh Cimicifuga racemosa. A previous systematic review of 16 RCTs that assessed the effects of oral black cohosh on somatic symptoms in 2, menopausal women found insufficient evidence to support the use of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms [ 41 ].

In our review, the results of a study evaluating the effect of black cohosh on psychological symptoms of 34 menopausal women revealed that black cohosh had no statistically significant effect on anxiety.

Arthralgia and edema were reported in one person 5. In a second RCT comparing black cohosh extract with St John's wort to placebo in menopausal women, the level of depression significantly decreased compared to placebo [ 17 ]. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this study if black cohosh is beneficial on its own or in combination with other herbs.

Combination of Danggui Angelicae sinensis and Huang Qi Astragalus membranaceus. Danggui, a traditional Chinese herb, is commonly used in conjunction with other herbs to treat menopausal problems [ 43 ]. However, in a RCT comparing Danggui combined with Huang Qi to placebo in women, there were no significant differences in the psychological domain of the Menopause Specific Quality of Life in those who received treatment versus those who did not [ 44 ].

Phytoestrogens are non-steroidal plant-derived compounds derived from various herbs that may produce estrogen effects [ 45 ]. According to the findings of a meta-analysis on the efficacy of phytoestrogens on menopausal symptoms, phytoestrogens appear to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flushes without causing adverse events [ 46 ].

We identified 8 studies on the effect of phytoestrogen-based herbal medicine on psychological symptoms of menopausal women in our review. The effect of a Korean botanical herb called EstroG containing 0.

Heger et al. The result of a study by Hirose et al. The result of another trial conducted by Steels et al. Shakeri et al. However, the findings of a study conducted by Carmignani et al. Another study also found that treatment with 30 mg of pomegranate seed oil containing kg of steroidal phytoestrogens per dose for six weeks had no effect on menopausal psychological symptoms [ 54 ].

While the majority of evidence suggests that phytoestrogens are safe and effective for alleviating psychological symptoms of menopause, more RCTs using standardized methods that allow for study comparison are thus required in order to draw definitive conclusions about their use.

Aromatherapy, also known as essential oil therapy, is thought to reduce anxiety and increase relaxation, which may be beneficial in alleviating stressful menopausal symptoms [ 55 ].

Bakhtiari et al. Aromatherapy combined with other CAM interventions may provide additional symptom relief. Another study by Taavoni et al. There is, however, insufficient evidence to support aromatherapy as a stand-alone treatment to manage the psychological symptoms of menopause.

All three studies that examined the effect of yoga on psychological symptoms in women found it to be beneficial with no negative side effects [ 1 , 59 , 60 ]. Elavsky and McAuley [ 1 ] found that a minute yoga session twice a week for four months reduced psychological symptoms of menopause.

Another study found that 75 minutes of supervised yoga practice twice a week for 12 weeks reduced stress levels and depression of menopausal women [ 59 ]. Joshi et al. This is consistent with a systematic review and meta-analysis that concluded that there was moderate evidence for the short-term effects of yoga on psychological symptoms in menopause [ 61 ].

Yoga appears to be safe and may be effective for psychological symptoms, according to a review of research. Four studies evaluated the effect of exercise and physical activity on different psychological symptoms of menopausal women.

A walking program three times a week for one hour in a large gymnasium on menopausal symptoms over a four-month period was found to be effective in improving mental health and reducing psychological symptoms in participants [ 1 ].

Another study examined the effect of a week training program that included 75 minutes of supervised stretching for the shoulder girdle, cervical muscles, and lower legs twice a week. The result showed no significant effect on the level of anxiety and depression of participants compared to the control group.

No adverse events were reported during the protocol [ 59 ]. Another study examined the effect of pedometer-based walking on depression and anxiety in postmenopausal women.

The intervention group's anxiety and depression levels were found to be lower [ 62 ]. Sternfeld et al. The findings revealed small but not statistically significant improvements in depressive symptoms [ 63 ]. Although a systematic review and meta-analysis found that exercise programs are a viable treatment option for anxiety [ 64 ], the inconsistent findings of trials in this review necessitate further research to determine the efficacy of exercise for psychological symptoms of menopause.

Three studies evaluated the effect of massage therapy on psychological symptoms of menopausal women. Espí-López et al. Lotfipur Rafsanjani et al. There is debate about whether there are true predictors of positive outcomes in clinical trial interventions.

One of the predictors that may taint the outcomes of massage therapy, for example, is communication between the therapist and the participants, which may bias the results. Two studies investigated the effect of 15—30 min foot reflexology for 12—19 sessions on menopausal women.

According to a recent study conducted by Mahdavipour et al. Another study, however, found no statistically significant differences in anxiety and depression symptoms between nonspecific foot massage and reflexology [ 67 ]. Because of inconsistent findings, more research is needed to determine the efficacy of reflexology for psychological symptoms of menopause.

One study investigated the short-and long-term effects of acupuncture on the quality of life-related measures of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. The findings revealed that acupuncture had a significant positive effect on memory and anxiety, and these benefits lasted for 6 months after treatment ended [ 68 ].

This is consistent with some previous trials that showed the effectiveness of acupuncture for alleviating psychological symptoms including anxiety in different target groups [ 69 , 70 ].

A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of anxiety disorder found that acupuncture is safe and effective for the treatment of anxiety disorder [ 71 ].

More research using precise methods is needed to determine the true efficacy of acupuncture and the mechanisms underlying the benefit that some participants receive. As with any systematic review, the current study has some limitations. The risk of bias of some of the included RCTs was considerable; additionally, selection biases, which are potential threats to all systematic reviews, may exist.

It is nearly impossible to blind participants, intervention providers, and outcome assessors in some studies that use interventions such as yoga, exercise, massage, aromatherapy, reflexology, and acupuncture, which may affect the results.

The majority of the studies were constrained by outcome questionnaires and sample size. The majority of study questionnaires were self-reported, and some trials had a small sample size.

Because most trials focused on the short-term effects, the long-term effects of such interventions are not well established. Limiting systematic reviews to English-only is also the limitation of our study, which can lead to biased effect estimates and reduce generalizability.

Despite the positive effect of various CAM interventions on reducing psychological symptoms, necessary precautions should be taken when using them in the clinical setting. More research with a higher methodology quality is required to make better decisions about the effect of various CAM interventions on psychological symptoms of menopause.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST: No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. Copy and paste a formatted citation from below or use one of the hyperlinks at the bottom to download a file for import into a bibliography manager. Home Archive v. Published online Dec 14, Efficacy of the Complementary and Alternative Therapies for the Management of Psychological Symptoms of Menopause: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Vahid Mehrnoush, 1 Fatemeh Darsareh , 2 Nasibeh Roozbeh, 2 and Avan Ziraeie 2. Author information. Author notes. Copyright and License. Address for Correspondence: Fatemeh Darsareh, Mother and Child Welfare Research Center, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Jomhuri Eslami Blvd, Bandar Abbas , Iran.

Tel: , Email: famadarsareh yahoo. Received June 29, ; Revised September 27, ; Accepted November 14, Go to:. Alternative medicine ; Complementary medicine ; Menopause ; Psychology ; Systematic review.

Click for larger image Download as PowerPoint slide. Table 1 Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool MMAT Click for larger image Click for full table Download as Excel file. Table 2 Summary of trials Click for larger image Click for full table Download as Excel file. Herbal and dietary supplements Evening primrose oil A result of a study investigating the effect of 1, mg of daily evening primrose oil EPO for eight weeks on psychological symptoms of menopausal women found significant improvements in the psychological symptoms after treatment compared to placebo.

Curcumin One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of daily curcumin for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran. Vitamin E One study investigated the effect of IU of vitamin E for eight weeks on the anxiety of 93 postmenopausal women in Iran.

Bitter orange One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of bitter orange for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women in Iran. Lavender One study investigated the effect of 1, mg of lavender for eight weeks on the anxiety of postmenopausal women.

Maca Lepidium meyenii Maca, an Andean plant of the brassica mustard family, has been used for centuries to treat infertility and female hormone balance [ 33 ]. Er-Xian decoction Er-Xian decoction is a Chinese herbal composed of different herbs that was initially designed and named by Zhang Bo-na in [ 36 ].

Wild yam Dioscorea Wild yam is a tonic nourishment that is high in ascorbic acid and protein; it is a tuber that has traditionally been used in Chinese medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including menopausal symptoms [ 39 ].

Black cohosh Cimicifuga racemosa A previous systematic review of 16 RCTs that assessed the effects of oral black cohosh on somatic symptoms in 2, menopausal women found insufficient evidence to support the use of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms [ 41 ].

Combination of Danggui Angelicae sinensis and Huang Qi Astragalus membranaceus Danggui, a traditional Chinese herb, is commonly used in conjunction with other herbs to treat menopausal problems [ 43 ]. Phytoestrogens Phytoestrogens are non-steroidal plant-derived compounds derived from various herbs that may produce estrogen effects [ 45 ].

Aromatherapy Aromatherapy, also known as essential oil therapy, is thought to reduce anxiety and increase relaxation, which may be beneficial in alleviating stressful menopausal symptoms [ 55 ].

Yoga All three studies that examined the effect of yoga on psychological symptoms in women found it to be beneficial with no negative side effects [ 1 , 59 , 60 ]. Exercise Four studies evaluated the effect of exercise and physical activity on different psychological symptoms of menopausal women.

Massage Three studies evaluated the effect of massage therapy on psychological symptoms of menopausal women. Reflexology Two studies investigated the effect of 15—30 min foot reflexology for 12—19 sessions on menopausal women.

Acupuncture One study investigated the short-and long-term effects of acupuncture on the quality of life-related measures of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Limitation As with any systematic review, the current study has some limitations.

Elavsky S, McAuley E. Physical activity and mental health outcomes during menopause: a randomized controlled trial. Ann Behav Med ;— PubMed CrossRef. Afridi I. Psychological and social aspects of menopause. In: Rodríguez-Landa JF, Cueto-Escobedo J, editors. A multidisciplinary look at menopause. London: IntechOpen; Zweifel JE, O'Brien WH.

A meta-analysis of the effect of hormone replacement therapy upon depressed mood. Psychoneuroendocrinology ;— Erratum in: Psychoneuroendocrinology ; Shifren JL, Schiff I.

Role of hormone therapy in the management of menopause. Obstet Gynecol ;— Paciuc J. Hormone therapy in menopause. Adv Exp Med Biol ;— Posadzki P, Lee MS, Moon TW, Choi TY, Park TY, Ernst E.

Prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine CAM use by menopausal women: a systematic review of surveys. Maturitas ;— Reid R, Abramson BL, Blake J, Desindes S, Dodin S, Johnston S, et al. Menopause and Osteoporosis Working Group.

Managing menopause. J Obstet Gynaecol Can ;— Hong QN, Fàbregues S, Bartlett G, Boardman F, Cargo M, Dagenais P.

The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool MMAT version for information professionals and researchers. Educ Inf ;— Sharif SN, Darsareh F. Impact of evening primrose oil consumption on psychological symptoms of postmenopausal women: a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Menopause ;— Bayles B, Usatine R. Am Fam Physician ;— Chenoy R, Hussain S, Tayob Y, O'Brien PM, Moss MY, Morse PF. Effect of oral gamolenic acid from evening primrose oil on menopausal flushing.

BMJ ;— Farzaneh F, Fatehi S, Sohrabi MR, Alizadeh K. The effect of oral evening primrose oil on menopausal hot flashes: a randomized clinical trial. Arch Gynecol Obstet ;— Agbabiaka TB, Wider B, Watson LK, Goodman C. Concurrent use of prescription drugs and herbal medicinal products in older adults: a systematic review.

Drugs Aging ;— Melo HM, Santos LE, Ferreira ST.

Essential Oils for Menopause: Which Work Best? | Nikura Longer trials are required to make more reliable decisions about the use and safety of EPO in clinical practice. and A. Silk Sleep Masks. Because of inconsistent findings, more research is needed to determine the efficacy of reflexology for psychological symptoms of menopause. Table 1 Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool MMAT. Comparison of the effect of Citrus aurantium and oxazepam on the preoperative anxiety of patients candidate for coronary artery implantation operation.
Graphical Abstract

Speak with your doctor before using essential oils for menopausal relief. Your doctor will be able to tell you if the oils will affect any medications that you may be taking.

You should also check with your doctor if you have any known allergies, as some oils may contain potential allergens. Coconut, jojoba, and olive oils are common carrier oils. A good rule of thumb is to add 1 ounce of carrier oil to every 12 drops of essential oil and mix. You should always perform a patch test before doing a full application.

To do this, apply the diluted oil to a small area of skin. The inside of the arm is generally a good location for this.

Wait 24 hours to see if your skin experiences any inflammation or irritation. If you do, discontinue use. If nothing happens, it should be OK for you to do a full application.

When you first start having menopausal symptoms, you should make an appointment with your doctor. Your doctor can give you helpful information as you begin your menopausal journey. Drug therapy is typically used to treat symptoms of menopause.

For many women, this may mean hormone therapy. Hormone therapy is the most effective treatment for hot flashes and night sweats. You may take doses of estrogen in pill, patch, gel, or cream form.

Some women may also need to take progestin. Estrogen can also relieve vaginal dryness. The hormone can be applied directly to the vagina via a low-dose tablet, ring, or cream. The estrogen is absorbed into the vaginal tissue. Several medications are available for hot flash relief, including antidepressants and gabapentin Neurontin.

Your doctor may also make fitness and dietary recommendations. Certain lifestyle changes may also help reduce symptoms. Check out: Menopause diet ». Menopause is a time of extreme change, but it can be manageable. Whether you prefer traditional or alternative therapies, you have options for relief.

Speak with your doctor about any concerns you may have so you can work with them to develop a treatment plan. Keep reading: Insomnia, sleep problems, and menopause ».

Our experts continually monitor the health and wellness space, and we update our articles when new information becomes available.

Essential oils can be a natural way to relieve pain. Here's how. Discover essential oils that may aid in constipation and other digestive issues. Find your institution then sign in to continue.

We found a match Your institution may have access to this item. Title Effects of Inhalation of Essential Oil of Citrus aurantium L.

amara on Menopausal Symptoms, Stress, and Estrogen in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial. The scent of sweet orange is always very pleasing to the senses and may make it easier to relax and unwind after a long, testing day.

Use it in a diffuser so it filters across your home, dilute it with a carrier oil and massage into the skin, or add a few drops to a hot bath to soak away your worries.

Bergamot is an extract from the offspring of a lemon and a sour orange and has been used medicinally for centuries in Italian and Southeast Asian communities. The scent of Bergamot Essential Oil is fresh and lemony and is perfect for uplifting your mood if you need a little boost. Women with menopause can regularly experience shifts in mood and higher levels of stress and anxiety and bergamot oil may help to bring a sense of calm and serenity for a short while.

There is a lot more understanding and support needed for women that experience menopause. For many, it is an extremely testing period of their life and the more information people have about this period of natural transitioning, the easier it can be to manage.

Essential oils do not offer a cure, of course, but they can become an important part of your daily routine and give you a natural way to combat some of the more difficult symptoms you experience. Discover the benefits of using rosemary oil for your hair and learn how to incorporate it into your routine with our helpful guide.

Learn about the use of jojoba, argan, coconut and others in diluting essential oils, enhancing skincare routines, and promoting wellbeing.

Explore the natural wonders of coconut oil for skincare, from hydration to healing. Revive your candles and prevent uneven burning with expert tips in our blog on fixing candle tunnelling.

Discover effective techniques to safely remove wax from candle jars and give them a new purpose, providing you with practical tips on revitalising your favorite candle containers. Master the essentials of CLP labeling for candles, ensuring safety and compliance in your candle-making business.

Explore the layered world of fragrance notes, from vibrant top layers to deep base notes, in this detailed guide for perfume lovers and aspiring perfumiers.

Explore creative and cost-effective packaging ideas for handmade soaps, suitable for small businesses and eco-friendly approaches. Jojoba oil may have a funny-sounding name, but it's powers for the skin, body, and hair are certainly no joke. The content in this article is for informational and educational purposes only and is not intended to take the place of medical advice.

Please consult your personal physician for any advice or treatment regarding specific health questions. Neither the article editor, writer, nor the organisation of Nikura takes any responsibility for possible health consequences following the information given in any article.

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The truth about hormone therapy for menopause Plant-based protein Drops: Atropa belladonna, 6C; Amyl nitrosum, 6C; Ayrantium pratensis, 4C; Sanguinaria canadensis, Aufantium Sepia officinalis, 5C. Place drops menoause your tongue Cittrus needed Citrus aurantium for menopause support help supprt menopausal symptoms. Hold the liquid under your tongue for 10 to 15 seconds before swallowing — this helps the sublingual glands absorb the remedy. For best results, try not to eat, drink or brush your teeth 30 minutes before or after taking the drops. Store in a cool, dark place, as far away from EMF electromagnetic fields, like phones, TV, alarm clocks as possible.

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